September 24 – National Punctuation and Cherries Jubilee Day.

National Punctuation and Cherries Jubilee Day are both celebrated on September 24th. Cherry lovers rejoice because today could be a great excuse for a cherry dessert. The credit for this dessert recipe goes to Auguste Escoffier, who prepared the dish for one of Queen Victoria’s Jubilee celebrations. Knowing the queen’s love for cherries, he poached them in syrup and poured warm brandy over them. He did not include ice cream in this recipe, but ice cream makes almost anything taste better, which is probably why modern recipes include it. Just before serving, the chef set the alcohol aflame, quite dramatically.
Question everything today with your use of question marks. Across the country, National Punctuation Day educates, tests people’s skills, and jokes about some errors. Commas, semicolons, exclamation points and periods are some examples of punctuation used in writing. A challenge is released every year on Jeff Rubin’s website. Visit the National Punctuation Day founder’s website today to participate in the challenge – this year, it’s hinted that you will have to venture away from your trusted keyboard, into the wilderness and sun to do some legwork for the challenge. Think you might be up to the task? View the website here.

Pretty Please with a Cherry on Top – Cherrie Jubilee Recipe

 

Ingredients:

  • Canned Cherries – 2 cans.
  • Sugar – 1 tablespoon.
  • Cornstarch – 1 tablespoon.
  • Cognac or Kirsch – ¼ cup, warmed.
  • Vanilla Ice Cream – 2 pints.

 

Method:

  • Remove the cherries from the cans and reserve the juice.
  • Combine some cherry juice, sugar, and cornstarch in a small dish.
  • Heat the remaining juice over moderate heat, adding the cornstarch mixture.
  • Add cherries to warm through once the juice has thickened.
  • Pour in warmed liqueur, and flame the pan to burn off alcohol.
  • Spoon cherries over ice cream in appropriate dishes.

Some Cherry Interesting Facts

  • The cherry, of the genus Prunus, is a fleshy stone fruit.
  • The heaviest cherry grown in the world weighed 0.76 oz. in 2003 to Geraldo Maggipinto in Italy.
  • Americans eat 1.5 pounds of cherries a year.
  • They were once used for medicinal purposes in the 15th and 16th
  • A sweet cherry tree produces about, on an average crop year, 800 cherries.
  • One pound holds about 44 cherries.
  • Cherries were introduced to Britain by Romans in the first century AD and are believed to have originated between the Black and Caspian Seas in Asia.
  • A prized food in 600 BC China, records indicate they were cherished by locals and suitable for royalty.
  • Languages did not always have punctuation – oral and body language showed all the meaning necessary. With written and printed language came the use of punctuation.
  • In the Western World, the first books printed were Bibles.
  • Sanskrit used only the vertical ‘|’ to show the end of a sentence.
  • A lot of Asian and African languages did not use punctuation but has adopted punctuation marks from European languages more recently.

Use your punctuation today, test your knowledge on it or take that founder’s challenge to celebrate today. And don’t forget to grab or make a Cherrie Jubilee to reward yourself at the end of the day.
• Sanskrit used only the vertical ‘|’ to show the end of a sentence.
• A lot of Asian and African languages did not use punctuation but has adopted punctuation marks from European languages more recently.
Use your punctuation today, test your knowledge on it or take that founder’s challenge to celebrate today. And don’t forget to grab or make a Cherrie Jubilee to reward yourself at the end of the day.


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